The Hummingwhale

Jennifer A. Connor, Writer

Tag: hummingbird

New Year’s Day, 2017

Slow Time

In the modern world we live at the speed of many lifetimes.

We live like a hummingbird beside an oak.

Love is a chemical thing, a puzzlement of nature,

one spandron of one cathedral in a

city of cathedrals where pilgrims gallop through.

The walkers appear slow, last in a

cascade of lives into layers, geologic cake,

your last footprint already fossilized.

We hardly need to reincarnate.

So it seems. My lovely friends

split into parts at the crack of the pace.

Who wants to be lost to the lace of the

wild carrot or lantern of bluebell?

The race is to multiply. Well, if you don’t

try, you may find you are very happy.

You may find you frolic in the seasons.

You may draw a deep breath like

cold water from a well of old, slow time.

 

 

 

Jennifer Connor

The Hummingwhale

draws the most crowds on the harbor cruise,
pays no taxes,
browses flora and deep waters equally,
guards its young, sups on nectar,
bears clumsy grace delicately.

It can name five tragedies of youth lost
and shakes its finfeathers to soul and funk and
minuets.  It paints self-representations
by the bouganville.

Uncatalogued by Melville,
defiant, in fact, of the whole cetalogical-ornithological-industrial complex,
the hummingwhale whistles Dixie while empires burn, oil rigs and biochemistry experiments.
It can get in through a keyhole and then destroy every chimp cage within reach of its tail.

Evolutionarily speaking, it refuses to be mythologized,
opting out of the Bestiary of Magical Creatures
as well as its high-school yearbook.

Recruited by the mafia
it went underground
and developed love-interests and web-based social media networks.
Never caught, never seen,
when it finally resurfaced,
the world was gone.  Such a thing to lose.
The hummingwhale settled in for long unbroken years
and began to tattoo its entire body with its life story,
high points, lows, offspring legit and not,
herbology of; anatomy of mood, placing the universe,
illustrating in smaller and smaller modes,
dividing and subdividing infinitely,
always to find one more place,
one more division of space to fill.

by Jennifer A. Connor

2011

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